Winter Work Term

Bree - Carnival Cruise

Webb Students gaining real life experience working across the U.S. and around the world!

Do you really know what is involved in the design and construction of a ship? To name a few things, you need to think about stability, resistance, propulsion, structures, cargo systems, electrical generation and distribution, heating, cooling, sewage, refrigeration, crew accommodations, government regulations, plus it needs to float!

We believe in a hands-on approach in order to gain the significant experience necessary to succeed in the field of naval architecture and marine engineering.

Our Winter Work internship allows you to have four unique learning opportunities to add to your resume by the time you graduate. This is one of the major reason why our students graduate with 100% job placementThis will be an experience you will never forget!


Learn the Ins and Outs of the Marine Industry

Why does Webb Institute require all students to perform internships?

We want you to go out into the marine industry to apply what you have learned in the classroom.  We want you interact, from a number of perspectives, with the ships, equipment, processes, and people of the industry to give you an insight in to how designs are developed and how what you will design will ultimately be constructed and operated.

When does my internship take place?

You will take a break from the classroom during the months of January and February. Perhaps spend the cold New York winter months in a shipyard in San Diego, a yacht design office in Florida, or aboard a ship on its way to Hawaii. If you really love the cold weather, enjoy your internship on an ice-breaker heading to Antarctica or a ship operations firm in Denmark.

Where will my internship be located?

Design Your Own Internship at Home or Abroad. You decide! You can work in offices of companies that design ships, work with the Navy testing ship models in the world’s most advance model basins, or work at a major cruise ship company. You are not just limited to the United States, you can work all over the world.

Health Requirements

All students must be physically and mentally capable of performing all work required in the academic courses and in the annual practical work periods. All students will be issued a United States Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Credential with Student Observer classification. To meet the document’s requirement, an applicant must have the agility, strength, and flexibility to climb steep or vertical ladders; maintain balance on a moving deck; pull heavy objects, up to 50 lbs in weight, distances of up to 400 feet; rapidly don an exposure suit; step over doorsills of 24 inches in height and open or close watertight doors that may weigh up to 56 pounds. Any condition that poses an inordinate risk of sudden incapacitation or debilitating complication, and any condition requiring medication that impairs judgment or reaction time are potentially disqualifying. Students with disabilities should contact the Office of Admissions to determine if they can complete the academic and practical aspects of the program with reasonable accommodation. The Institute reserves the right to exclude from continued class attendance or enrollment any student who, in the judgment of the administration, is not physically or mentally qualified to follow the regular curricular program.

Freshman Year

During Freshman year students work alongside ship fitters and welders in shipyards. 

Companies Freshman Worked For:

Freshman Job Duties:

  • Welding
  • Sanding
  • Painting
  • Grinding
  • Shipfitting
  • Pipefitting
  • Component and System Testing

Sophomore Year

Sophomores serve as student observers aboard ocean going ships to gain hand-on understanding and appreciation for the relationships between the marine environment, the shipping industry, the ship’s operators, and the ship’s design. 

Types of Ships:

  • Container ships
  • Roll-on/Roll-off
  • Tankers
  • Military supply ships
  • General Cargo ships

Sophomore Job Duties:

  • Work in the engine room maintaining and repairing machinery
  • Serve watch on the bridge
  • Participate in cargo handling exercises
  • Support underway replenishment activities
  • Assist shipboard helicopter landings

Junior and Senior Year

Juniors and seniors network and apply themselves in design and engineering offices around the world.

One student worked with the company that salvaged the Costa Concordia, a cruise ship that had grounded, flooded, and rolled over on to its side off the coast of Italy.  He can proudly state that he was the last person on the ship before it was completely raised. You cannot compare this type of real world experience.

Student, Dylan standing in front of half-raised ship, Costa Concordia

Read Student First-Hand Experiences

Bree Louie

Bree Louie ’17

Cruising Miami

Brianna Louie ’17 will be spending her Winter Work term in Miami, FL working for Carnival Cruise Lines as an Energy Efficiency Intern.

Tom Hickey

Tom Hickey ’18

Webbie In The Gulf

Tom Hickey ’18  will be spending his Winter Work term aboard the Evergreen State.  The Evergreen State is a 600 foot petroleum carrier owned by American Petroleum Tankers and operated by Crowley Maritime.

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Andrew Vogeler ’18

From Belgium to the Persian Gulf and Back

Read about Andrew Vogeler’s sea term experience aboard the Maran Gas Al Jassasiya;  as he and his classmate, Megan Green, travel from Belgium through the Suez Canal to ports in the Persian Gulf and back.