Junior Class Small Vessel Design Project (SD1)


As a part of Professor Bradley D.M. Golden’s ’99 Ship Design 1 (SD1) class, the juniors spent the first two-and-a-half months of the spring semester preparing their first complete concept designs.

Using the knowledge they’ve gained in their nearly three years studying at Webb and the experiences from their winter work periods to date, this was the students’ first opportunity to apply the naval architecture and marine engineering principles they’ve studied including stability, ship’s structures, main machinery systems, auxiliary systems, resistance and propulsion, and electrical engineering.

Working in small groups of three and four, the students selected one of the vessel types and took their first couple of spins around the design spiral to prepare vessel concept designs. To help make the project as realistic as possible, members of industry familiar with each of the vessel types helped prepare the statements of design requirements that each of the designs had to meet. To challenge the students even further, one or two “curveballs” were thrown into each design statement to make the students think long and hard about how they would achieve their objectives.

At the end of the spring semester, the students presented their final designs to their fellow students, faculty, and members of industry who served as part of an evaluation team. After three years at Webb, the Junior class can now say with confidence that they’re familiar with the design process and are well on their way to joining the fields of naval architecture and marine engineering.

Spring 2020 projects - The Class of 2021

Salvage Support VesselC.T.H.U.L.H.U SSV

Designers: Ian Cosic, Dillon Esposito-Kelly, Bret Sharman, and Cross Weeks

Vessel Type: Salvage Support Vessel

Standard Mission:
The standard anticipated mission of the vessel is the oil extraction of RULET wrecks. For this purpose, the vessel is outfitted with subsea oil extraction system, and dive capability to 150ft. The vessel is also capable of installation of a deck mounted 3 chamber saturation diving system for deeper wrecks. Also, the vessel is capable of towing a barge by the hip or over the stern. The vessel is outfitted with a 30 Lt crane to transfer iso tanks between vessels and aid in any salvage operations.

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Cross-Harbor RoRo Truck Ferry

Cross-Harbor RoRo Truck (CHaRRT) Ferry

Designers: Inga Johansson, Alex Koziol, and Hank Rouland

Vessel Type: RoRo Truck Ferry

Standard Mission:
The CHaRRT Ferry was designed for the NYC Economic Development Corporation’s Ports and Transport Division. The ferry is designed for a daily round trip from Port
Newark to Pier 81 in Manhattan. This truck ferry will relieve rush hour bridge traffic and is representative of a collective movement towards short sea shipping.

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Fireboat renderingTeam Hot Stuff 

Designers: Jack Becker, Jackson Juska, and Maggie Maguire

Vessel Type: Fireboat

Standard Mission:
In response to an increasing need for firefighting services in the Port of Los Angeles/Long Beach area, the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) has commissioned Team Hot Stuff to design a new class of firefighting vessels. This class must bridge the gap between the LAFD’s existing larger and smaller vessels by providing not only a fast response time but also a large pumping capacity. During its service, this vessel must respond to and suppress fires, provide emergency medical services, defend against acts of terrorism, respond to environmental pollution, aid in search and rescue operations, and provide specialty team support.

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Humanitarian Relief VesselM/V Conchy Joe

Designers: Daniel Desio, Addie Lindyberg, Shannon Liu, and Lina Tenenbaum

Vessel Type: Humanitarian Relief Vessel

Standard Mission:
The M/V Conchy Joe is a purpose-built humanitarian relief vessel designed to respond to natural disasters in the Caribbean. It is capable of delivering supplies, relief workers, communications, a medical team, fresh water, and survey equipment for a command and control center. The vessel is capable of remaining on-site for 14 days without requiring replenishment.

The vessel’s secondary mission is a day ro-pax ferry operating in the Bahamas, remaining in service for 200 days per year.

The M/V Conchy Joe is flagged in the Bahamas and must comply with ABS and SOLAS regulations. The vessel must also comply with EPA Tier-4 emissions requirements.

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LNG Bunkering Vessel4,200 M3 LNG Bunkering Vessel

Designers: Alec Bidwell, Oscar Como, Luke Herbermann, and Ben Hunt

Vessel Type: LNG Bunkering Vessel

Standard Mission:
The mission of this concept design is to bunker two cruise ships, operating out of San Juan, PR and Miami, FL. Cargo will be loaded at the JAX LNG Terminal in Jacksonville, FL. Two identical bunkering vessels will service the route on a staggered rotation, ensuring each cruise ship receives 1500cuM of LNG each week.

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Wind Farm Support VesselOffshore Wind Farm Support Vessel

Designers: Ryan Flanagan, Robert Maes, and Sean Healy

Vessel Type: Offshore Wind Farm Support Vessel

Standard Mission:
The mission of this vessel is to support future offshore wind farms in the United States. The ship accommodates up to 30 technicians, has a motion compensated walk-to-work gangway, two work areas, a deck crane, utility gangway, and is capable of DP-2.

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